Collaboration in Academic Research

In a recent editorial in EyeNet on the importance of collaboration in successful research, past-president of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Ruth Williams, M.D. cites Dr. Novack.  Dr. Novack stated “…You cannot be successful unless you realize that you do NOT know everything”.  Further she states that “…major breakthroughs usually require a multi-disciplinary approach, ophthalmic researcher must recognize and woo individuals who may not currently be working on vision research”.  A prime example of this is the Glaucoma Research Foundation’s “Catalyst for a Cure”.

Dr. Novack honored

Gary D. Novack, Ph.D., was selected to be a fellow of the American College of Clinical Pharmacology (ACCP). ACCP consists of a full spectrum of clinical pharmacology professionals from academia, industry, government and clinical settings who span the scope from research and drug development to patient-related care and who remain dedicated to advancing clinical pharmacology with the ultimate goal of enhancing patient care. ACCP seeks to address the educational needs of its diverse membership and all healthcare professionals, covering a range of topics that span the entire area of the interaction between drugs and humans.

Myopia prevention journal issue

Dr. Novack’s article on pharmacological prophylaxis of myopia was published in a special issue of  Eye and Contact Lens.  This issue (Volume 44 / Issue Number 4, July 2018) features articles on Myopia Control: Current thoughts and future research.  It was edited by Drs. Penny A. Asbell and Kazuo Tsubota.  The publication is based upon a symposium held in November 2017 in Tokyo at Keio University.  The issue includes authors from a wide variety of perspectives.  All agree – myopia is an epidemic that will continue to take medical resources to deal with the increasing number of affected patients worldwide.

Ophthalmic Drug Delivery – Dr. Novack quoted in EyeWorld

Dr. Gary Novack was quoted in an article on ophthalmic drug delivery in the May 2018 issue of ASCRS‘s EyeWorld.  Dr. Novack pointed out “…In considering what molecules might be most likely to succeed in a sustained delivery approach…this depends on the type of delivery system. If it’s a zero order, i.e., constant delivery with respect to time system, a molecule like brimonidine or timolol is most appropriate,” … “If it’s a pulsatile, i.e., peaks and troughs system, a molecule like the prostaglandins is the better choice.”  Dr. Novack has published several articles on issues in ophthalmic drug delivery, and worked on a number of successful products in this area.